About Me

Bio

I am Assistant Professor of Ancient Near Eastern History at the University of Toronto’s Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations (NMC). I’m currently Principal Investigator of the research project MTAAC (Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages), funded through the T-AP Digging into Data Challenge (2016 round).

 

Education

  • DPhil in Assyriology (University of Oxford)
  • MPhil in Cuneiform Studies (University of Oxford)
  • BA in Archaeology (University of Cambridge)

 

Employment

  • 2014–present: Assistant Professor in Ancient Near Eastern History, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto
  • 2009—2014: Senior Postdoc and PI of project “Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Mesopotamia,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 2003–2009: Postdoc, START Project “The Economic History of Babylonia in the First Millennium BC,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 1999–2002: Research Associate, State Archives of Assyria Project, University of Helsinki; from July 1999, Editor-in-Charge of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
  • 1993–1998: Editorial Assistant/IT Assistant (part-time), A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (a British Academy Major Research Project)
  • 1994–1995: Curator Grade G (part-time), Department of the Middle East, the British Museum
  • 1984–1989: Field Archaeologist employed on various excavation and post-excavation projects in England, Cyprus, Turkey, Jordan, and Iraq

 

Grants & Awards

  • MTAAC (Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages): Toronto team funded by SSHRC via the Trans-Atlantic Platform Digging into Data Challenge (2017–2019)
  • Compute Canada Research Platforms and Portals award of computational resources to establish a Toronto mirror for the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) (2017–2020)
  • Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Mesopotamia: funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) as part of the National Research Network “Imperium and Officium: Comparative Studies in Ancient Bureaucracy and Officialdom” (2009–2015)